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diario de guepardos el centro ♪ shadow ♪ yankee, zulu. x-ray whiskey baggins morocco capÍtulo 6 (narrador) en el episodio anterior nuestros cuatro embajadores en entrenamiento, conocieron a la nueva directora del proyecto, beryl patterson, una veterinaria de norteamérica que dirigirá el proyecto de cachorros de cheetah outreach, y entrenará a whiskey, x-ray, yankee y zulu, para representar a su propia especie frente a audiencias públicas. baggins, el cerval se rehúsa a cooperar con su nuevo entrenador christo. baggins, también es entrenado como embajador pero cheetah outreach, descubrió que la personalidad de este gatito es completamente diferente a la de los cheetahs es muy divertido pero cuesta mucho trabajo entrenarlo. y la pequeña whiskey, la cachorra cheetah de tres meses tuvo una operación mayor para corregir un defecto de nacimiento en el ojo derecho. la operación salió bien y whiskey fue puesta en aislamiento por unos días para recuperarse. esta vez iniciamos con otra visita al centro médico de animales del cabo... con yankee, el más joven de los cuatro cac
himselfs in cultures and languages and took multiple trips to study abroad in spain, italy, morocco. perhaps most importantly chris knew how to relax and enjoy the moment. when i would periodically freak out about my course work or some o ther problem i thought i had he would make me stop and take a break, play a game of back gammon on the balcony and enjoy the view. it was an early lesson in the zenlike mindfulness of chris. no wonder he exceled in such a challenging and stressful career. i don't want you to think chris was perfect. after extensive research we came up with at least one or two blemishes on his record, sort of. in the interest of time i'm leaving out inappropriate limericks about philosophers. the only time i saw him lose his temper is when we were sharing a double room in the last year. some of the lessen lightened brethren decided to make a bunch of noise during finals week. when yelling at these guys didn't do the trick, chris burst out of bed, ran out onto the balcony, grabbed a water fire extinguisher and let them have it. he seemed much less angry when he came
traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. since joining the service i spent almost my entire career in middle east and africa. one of the things that impressed me were people old enough to have lived and traveled in the united states when we had closer relations. those days are back. we had 1,700 libyans apply for fullbright grants to study in the united states this year, more than any other country in the world. we know that libya is still recovering from an intense period of conflict. there are many courageous libyans who bear the scars of that battle. we are happy we have been able to treat some of your war wounded at u.s. hospitals. we look forward to building partnerships between american and libyan hospitals to help return libya's healthcare system to the extraordinary standards of excellence it once enjoyed. over my shoulder here you can see the u.s. capitol building. in that building 535 elected representatives from every corner of america come together to debate the is
, this is an inspiring journey, and a medical miletone for a veteran. bronnen morocco held a press conference after undergoing a double-arm transplant. he will now spend several years working six hours a day in rehab to regain nearly the full use of his arms. morocco lost all four limbs in an explosion in iraq four years ago. a team of surgeons attached his new arms in december. six weeks later, he was able to wheel himself into a room of reporters. >> i feel like i'm getting a second chance to start over after i got hurt, so i'm -- i'm excited. excited for the future to see where i can go with it. >> he has big plans. he wants to drive his car against and eventually complete a marathon using an arm bicycle. >>> this is a new exhibit that doesn't paint a pretty picture. artists on both sides of the gun control debate share their thoughts and work inspired by the tra >>> gymnast gabby doug laws made history. now she's giving some of her personal items to the smith sonia. she donated wrist tape and uneven bar grips that she used. doug laws is the first african-american woman to win gold in the gymnas
has a different story. muhammed is a berber with the degree. he left a mark -- morocco because he wants to live a secular life style there and claims he cannot. it took 4.5 hours of flying from the morocco to turkey. from turkey, he made four attempts to cross the river into northern greece. >> there were me and some afghans in about. after 10 minutes, the boat capsized. we had to swim for it. >> the boat turned over? not of the afghans could swim and they drowned. >> we have no way of verifying that claim. now, he is in limbo. his asylum claim entitled him to stay in greece. -- for one organization us to help people. only give one appointment per week. we have a list of hundreds of people. one employment per week is like nothing. >> it is almost impossible to claim asylum. here is why. in athens, every friday night, accused of migrants form spread some of these men have been here since wednesday. only at this one place in the city can you actually claim asylum. the police take only 20 claims a week. this selection process has been described as arbitrary. the police say it has imp
funding for this program was provided by... for a thousand years or more, the tanners of morocco have sorted, processed and sold the skins of animals. their leather-making skill is world renowned. archaeologists now believe such economic specialization here and elsewhere evolved over thousands of years. they are studying the evolution of specialization as they uncover details of ancient economies around the world. in the maya city of copan, a jeweler fashioned rare shell and jade for his powerful lord. in mexico, living artisans echo the economy of a vanished civilization. and in teotihuacan, evidence of mass production has now been unearthed. tiny faces of clay reflect the men and women who made them a thousand years ago. on the other side of the world, in the ancient roman city of ostia, huge merchant ships were part of an economy much like our own. and today, the tanners of morocco still practice their ancient craft, living proof that economies have evolved out of the past. everyone who has ever lived has been part of an economic system. iel bote grande...mil pesos! economic s
, for the last of those years, country director for morocco and tunisia. earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work which we will see john out, up in northern mali. very delighted to have him on our team at the africa center, as well as as a friend. also delighted to have another ,ld friend, dr. ricardo renÉ dr. of science at binghamton university on islam. he has been a colleague, i might mention that he and i are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. delighted to have him as a scholar of the region and a friend and our wives have become friends as well. it is in the family, so to speak. last but not least, this dr. is a political scientist and senior fellow at the middle east program of the carnegie endowment. and author of quite a number of works, some quite prescient in their timing on al qaeda. you have their biographical notes for fuller details. one thing not in the notes, i cannot resist mentioning that while there are few discussions of the crisis in mali going around washington, this will be the only one where the panel speakers includes individuals who have b
are not tempted to come anymore. they would prefer to go to neighboring places like morocco. this is exactly why the government has been trying its best, along with international donors to try to send reassuring messages that, if we manage to have a peaceful deal with all the opposition parties for at least two years to three years, we can at least put the country back on track. with all of these problems, it is going to be a recipe for economic disaster, which, as you said, the country cannot really afford. >> at least 26 people have been killed in a series of bomb attacks in the capital of baghdad. many of them happened in babil and cut the mia -- khatamiya. a suicide bomber has burned himself up near the city of gao in mali. as the troops push north towards the algerian border -- sorry. can we go to jackie? >> yes, jane. you were asking about the troops, the clashes between the rival groups of troops here in bamako. what i can tell you is that it really does seem to be underlining the fact that the malian army is far from stable, disciplined, and united. we are seeing rivalries coming to the
to who would play his mother. >> i went over to morocco with my producer's hat firmly on my head. at mark's encouragement really, he said i think you're not seeing the obvious. >> downey herself stepped into the role. there are a few real world problems to overcome, too. like the snakes. >> we had so many snakes on our moroccan set that we had to have a man to come in and clear the locations of snakes and scorpions. >> these are not garden snakes. >> no, no. these are cobras and vipers. >> but one snake would be cast in a starring role as satan, which meant they'd have to take their new jesus into letting the snake crawl over him. >> i said to roma, you lay down. let's let that big snake crawl across you. we'll take video and photos of it. we'll show that to him. there's no way he can say no when he sees that you've done it. and that's what worked. >> is that what you did? >> that's what i did. i took one for the team. >> i'm still on the snake crawling across you. just slow down here. >> and as the "survivor" family, there has to be a little competition. on the horizon, a whole new slew
as well. gray skies in morocco. that system will move east over the next few days. for the time being, algeria will see a few clouds at times with temperatures not bad, getting up to about 16 degrees. the farther east, in turkey, clouds gradually making their way towards us. around the western coast on tuesday. the capitol will get to about nine degrees. if it should >> president chavez has returned to venezuela from cuba where he was receiving cancer treatment. he made the announcement via twitter. the 58-year-old had not been seen in public since december. the u.n. is accusing members of the syrian government of war crimes. the allegations are from our reports as regime forces committed rape, torture, and arbitrary detention. it also says rebels have committed crimes against humanity. pakistani shia are demanding action against those responsible for the bombing in quetta. relatives of the victims are refusing to bury their dead until the government acts. the attacks killed 84 people. remains of more than 150 people have been found in a mass grave in central sri lanka. the forensic i
, joining one in morocco, senegal, uganda, and a permanent one in djibouti. u.s. drone attacks ordered by obama have spiked particularly in yemen, somalia, afghanistan, and notably pakistan where over 360 drone strikes over the nine years, 2004 to 2013, have killed over 3,000 people. this data is not classified. and not even secret. but it is troubling. so troubling that the u.n. has just decided to launch an investigation on the impacts of drone strikes on thousands of civilians. question. will the u.n. human rights council rule that drone use violates international law do you think, pat buchanan? >> i don't think they l. if they do, john, it doesn't make any difference. but we really ought to be concerned about these drones. they're a tremendously effective weapon. they save our pilots and the rest of it. but the collateral damage, the killing of civilians, the killing of children, the tremendous alienation they've increased all over this region has resulted in al-qaida frankly getting a tremendous number of new recruits. are we recruiting more enemies than we're killing? that's the
, but the new system is clearly a step in a transition to a constitutional monarchy. morocco has taken a similar route as jordan in acting constitutional reforms in 2011, as well. on the other hand, the arab world's two largest experiments in democracy, iraq and egypt, have unfortunately made poor choices in common. both placed elections ahead of constitutions, popular participation ahead of individual rights. both have had, as their first elected leaders, strong men with islamest backgrounds who have no real dedication to liberal democracy. the results have been the establishment of illiberal democracy in iraq and the danger of a similar system in egypt. the best role models for the region might well be two small monarchies, although much more reform is needed in both places. but, basically, jordan and morocco have chosen evolution over revolution. so far, it seems the better course. for more on this, go to cnn.com/fareed for a link to my "washington post" column. let's get started. >>> bill gates is the richest man in america and the second richest man in the world. this, despite having alread
. check for accidents, not seeing reports right now. keith, back over to you. >>> brendan morocco continues to do more and more with his two new arms. a team of surgeons at johns hopkins hospital performed the hospital's first successful double arm transplant in december. the doctor joins us this morning with more on this ground breaking surgery. and why was it such a medical breakthrough? >> well, it's a miracle. first we had the fans france plant at the university of maryland and now we have the most successful arm transplant right here at johns hopkins. so very exciting. true medical miracle. >> so, what was all involved in this process. if we could break it down for the layman. >> again, brendan morocco was an iraqi vet, lost four limbs when a vehicle he was driving had a bomb explode. he's been waiting since 2009 and he had a donor. replaced two of his arms. now he has his arms. as he said, it's so important in speaking and talking and gesturing to have these arms. and the likelihood is that he's going to be able to use these arms to tie his shoes, to do activities of that na
from marching here in d.c. with the inaugural parade with inauguration of morocco. we bring them forward this symbolic justice granted can only be guaranteed further beyond the boundaries to carry for through tragedy and transformation we say the names of dr. dyson have taught me and so many others so much about intellectual inquiry that flows through the head and the heart and always between people. to the to do to 2000 attendees of the march whose names we don't know well enough we hope to know more of you we would to both record them in speaker them with their history as well as our pathway forward. and finally, a leonard freed whose marches the beauty insignificance of the gathering as they face collective action and transformation and in leonard's memory and with the photographs of the past and with our future we say his name, leonard freed and express our gratitude for all of his contributions. this is the day. thank you. [applause] [applause] >> of course, i want to express our gratitude to our three speakers. it has been a terrific program and they have made it such. we w
of filming in morocco diogo re-enacted the death of jesus on the cross. roma downey portrays mother mary. >> it's the highest point of christianity. it turns out to that moment, you know. and i was doing it. why me? >> have you thought about that a lot since then? >> i had a lot of time on that cross. and i remember that. one time i was just, like, i started crying. and i took, like, 30 minutes before i stopped. i don't remember the pain, the physical pain. i don't remember it. i do remember the loneliness. >> do you feel like you're a better person for having done it? >> i am, oh, surely. 100%. this -- i mean, this project changed my life. >> who is diogo morgado. he is from portugal. he's 33. has acted in films and telanovelas since he was a teenager. >> are you the king of the jews? >> are you asking or is it a question coming from mother? >> "the bible" premieres march 3rd on history. >> i'm just profoundly grateful for this opportunity. >> excuse me. >> bless you. >> thank you. it's nice to have jesus say bless you. he's just the actor. just to clarify that. thank you. >> my kingdom
they were mass produced in molds. across the atlantic is fez, morocco, a city that has changed little in a thousand years. here can be found an analogy for the economy of ancient teotihuacan. this is a leather tanning workshop, where fine skins are produced for market. the tanning requires the labor of literally dozens of specialists -- to remove the hair, wash the hides, tan them, and get them ready for market. such economic specialization is only possible in a city, a place where a dense population of consumers provides a demand for the goods massroduced in these workshops. the emergence of cities is a common thread in the worldwide tapestry of human history. as cities grew, the pace of commerce and innovation quickened. the gulf between rich and poor widened and political power was gathered into the hands of a few. today most of us are city dwellers. we take for granted our rich and complex way of life. as archaeologists reach back in time, they reveal the individual steps in the long human journey that led us here. it is an odyssey that follows similar and predictable patterns in
, the palestinian authority, and the chief of government of morocco. syria, of course, was of urgent importance. of all the leaders there, the prime minister of lebanon probably had the most at stake. his country is almost encircled by syria. about 200,000 syrian refugees have escaped to lebanon, adding an extra 5% to lebanon's population. listen to a businessman-turned-politician who clearly wants to keep the problems of syria from infecting his own increasingly prosperous country. >> we are disassociating ourselves from what's going on in syria by all means. we are dissociating because we have a kind of historical, geographical relationship with syria. and now today if we take any position, really, we would be boosting the division in our lebanese society and between lebanese citizens. for this reason, we have the position to disassociate ourselves, but this does not mean we disassociate ourselves from the issue. today we are receiving syrians and fully ensure for them medical care, schooling, food, everything. >> should the arab league put greater pressure on ba shash al assad to -- >> we ar
were shot entirely on location in morocco. we were over there from february until june of last year. and it has been an extraordinary journey to bring these stories to the screen. >> bill: it really is. mr. burnett you are going to get criticized, you know that by the secular progressives and they are going to say this is a bunch of propaganda and why are you doing this. how are you going to answer that criticism. >> we love the story. it's the most important book in the history of the world. amazing biblical ill literacy. i really believe the bible should be taught in public schools. it's embarrassing for americans go overseas. doing business in rio de janeiro and berlin and paris and not know who david and goliath were. it's embarrassing. >> bill: it is. certainly the scriptures both old and new testament have been played down in this country. all right. we're going to be looking for it. the bible, thanks for coming on. >> thank you. >> bill: come back from l.a. it will be miller time. dennis miller critiques the peta ad that was banned from oscars. miller is next. >> bill: thanks
gdp of morocco. think about it. an entire country. talk about there fair share. the fair share, if that's what we are striving more, the irs has to give its money back. unlike your pet projects like solyndra, exxon is more than profitable, and it puts money back into the economy in the form of nearly $37 billion in energy investments. stop making them out to be the bad guys. like you have other successful americans that take pride in a u.s. company being number one in the world. that's a good thing. coming up next, traders seem to love today's jobs numbers, but were they really all that good? our political panel weighs in, and stocks on a roll, lately, topping numbers not seen since 2007. how long will it last, and how high will they go? coming up. coming up. ♪ [beep] [speaking foreign language] [heart beating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... ♪ announcer: this song was created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help fro
to marc ginsberg who has served as the ambassador to morocco as we look at the new foreign policy team in place by obama. later, the 1986 immigration reform law. what was in it and what to learn from it? first, it looked as some of the other shows, including the super bowl that will face a nation. >> the super bowl will be the topic of some discussion, a lot with president obama's second term agenda, gun violence, and immigration. we read air the show starting at noon at"meet the press." today, leon panetta and martin dempsey. at 1:00 here "this week." the former d.c. public schools chancellor makes an appearance and lou barletta. "fox news sunday" with wayne la pierre and mark kelly, husband of gabby giffords. "state of the union" at 3:00 with leon panetta and martin dempsey. four-o'clock, "face the nation" roger goodell. the sunday talk shows rearing but he by a public service by the networks. it begins at noon with "meet the press." listen to them all on c-span radio, 90.1 fm in the washington area. 119 on xm satellite radio. you can go online to cspanradio.org. [captions copyright
to the state department looking at our embassies, and in particular i want to highlight morocco. here we are spending over $150 million building a new embassy in morocco, and we have yet to assay and look at what the value and possibility of sale of our current embassy. right there to me it seems like in looking at properties -- i'm not a real estate expert, but it seems to me when we're making a transaction like that, we're looking in the neighborhood of somewhere to $60-$80 million in assets that need to have some assaying. do you know that they had to beg and as of -- there were about, i would say, wouldn't you say it's about 50% completed, that embassy, chairman? >> that sounds correct. >> yeah. they have yet to have an assay of the current buildings and inventory of properties that they had in morocco. i find that disdainful. this is an instant turn around of quickly $80 million, and we shouldn't be building unless we actually know what we have in inventory and make sure that we're selling it. that is disrespectful for the american taxpayer. i'm just giving you one example. extrapol
, then the message gets lost. >> arthel: right. answer this, just a number quickly, how important is morocco rubio to the republican party, 1 to 10? >> he's up there in the 8 or 9 range. if you just do the math, you understand and i know you understand this, you do the math and look at the demographics, i have no doubt that mitt romney would have won the election in reagan america if the demographics were as they were in the '80s. but it's changed and that change has helped the democratic party and poses real challenges to republicans. >> arthel: rubio is very, very important to the republican party? >> a very important person. vip. >> arthel: a vip in all caps for sure. so he's going to deliver this speech in english and in spanish. is there any chance that this could come across as play indicating or will it be considered authentic across the board? >> well, you know, it's a risk because there is a strong english only movement in this country. there is a lot of people, you know about los angeles. i hear it all the time, who get annoyed that everything is english or spanish and say to themselves,
's made of red morocco leather with brass beaded studs, but the interesting thing was when you opened it inside it had the original maker's label "john viney, trunk chest and plate case manufacturer of aldersgate street." and john viney is? well, the antique dealer thought because i had the same name i might be interested in the trunk as indeed i was. what he didn't know was that it was my great-great-great grandfather who made this trunk. really? so it was a very special moment for me. i bought it and i've had it ever since. and from the family history aldersgate street, we know that he was working there from 1809 to 1811, so we can date it pretty accurately. and inside i keep various bits of family memorabilia. obviously when john viney was around, photography wasn't invented, but that's his son, my great-great-grandfather. and i keep all the bits of family history in it. and i have a son, oscar, and i will pass it on to him in due course. wonderful. paul, thank you so much. thank you, fiona. now here we have the title page of the atlas to one of captain cook's
by the state department on pottery classes in more rough morocco? why are we spending $27 million on pot aon pottery classes in morocco? the size of the state department is twice the size it was five years ago twice the size in terms of total expenditures. the other thing we talked about is the subsidies of the rich and famous in terms of what's out there. on average we found $30 billion a year that millionaires -- people who make at least $1 million a year -- enjoy in benefits from tax giveaways and federal grant programs. that's $30 billion a year. that's $300 billion -- that's a third -- over a third of what we're talking about on the sequestration. and yet we've done nothing on it. this has been out for a year. $74 million went -- of unemployment checks went to millionaires last year. $74 million. people who made a million dollars, but we still paid them unemployment. we sent $89 million for preservation of ranchers and estates. people that are making more, net income adjusted gross income, above $1 million a year. we send them $9 billion of retirement checks. we sent them $5.6 billion o
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
in morocco, right? you are used to the tough environments. after "survivor." you didn't put yourself through anything you put your old contestants through, i hope. >> i'm used to having giant film crews in remote locations. it was six months. and roma did great. >> there was dust in places i never knew existed. >> and the snakes, i hear. >> there were snakes. we had a snake man on the set, just to clear it. >> just to clear all of the cobras? and you get the gold star for hanging in there. you, i know, are an old hand at that. anyway, thank you so much for being with us. "the bible" premieres sunday on history channel. it's a great thing to watch with your kids, as well. >>> coming up, he won "iron chef america" and the battle of the bulge. we're in the is kitchen with jesse schenker. >>> we are back, now, with one of the hottest, young chefs in the country. everyone says so. jesse schenker's new york city restaurant gets rave reviews. it's "the new york times" that says that. it's "new york" magazine that says that. you won "iron chef america." "gq" magazine. "details" magazine, calls you o
of political experts. jim, welcome back. good to see you . your partner peter is in morocco. must be nice. >> hopefully he won't get arrested. >> and just in case he does we have rodell mollineau. and he's a political democrat strategist. welcome to the show. >> thank you. >> president obama heading up the road today to sort of meet with some senate democrats to talk about some of these issues. jim, i'm sure more liberal issues the president is trying to push. we're talking about gun control, immigration, the economy. how important is this backing to him right now as he moves forward? rodell let me start with you today. >> sure. one thing democrats need to do is to realize on a lot of these issues, the public on their side when it comes to immigration and certain kinds of gun control. sometimes democrats start on the defensive and work back from there. and i think the president is just kind of going to be there and to say i'm with you, the american public is with you, they can get these things done and have momentum on the side. >> how tough will it be when you have to leave that security
. >> on location in morocco for how many months? >> five months. we had dust in places we didn't know existed. >> a lot of krif iss and cracks in your body. >> it's been incredible, though. really. we've enjoyed it. there have been moments, i'm sure, when we thought we might kill each other, but we've made it, and i think that it's deepened our friendship. it's deepened our marriage, and it's deepened our faith. >> mention being married to an angel and ok the set with 400 people, they're always going to take the wrong side in every disagreement. don't listen to what i say. >> you have assembled an extraordinary cast, including your wife, who plays the mother of jesus, and nobody is saying for sure how much money was put into this thing, but whatever you put into it shows in the production value of it. i saw a little bit at your house a couple of months ago, and i thought, whoa, they didn't shishg on the money on this thing. >> when you look at the clip you just showed, that could have come off -- >> as cheesy. >> yeah. it looks terrific. >> we hired an incredible special effects company out o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)